Guiding Principles

In order to best serve the diverse population of Rutgers University, we organize our practices around the following principles:

  1. Students learn most effectively when engaged in active, student-centered, cooperative learning that leads to critical thinking, content literacy, and independent learning.
  1. In order to be successful students and professionals, students must learn to be self-regulating, reflective learners who engage in deep questioning.
  1. Students benefit most from academic support services that use a holistic approach that comprehensively addresses the multiple academic needs of students and offers a variety of means of support to accommodate diversity in student learning.

These principles are aligned with current best practices in education, as necessitated by the following trends in enrollment:

  • Increased enrollment of non-traditional students, and students transferring from community colleges[1], and international students[2]
  • Increased enrollment of underprepared and underprivileged students[3]
  • Increased focus on STEM support, as necessitated by the AAU’s STEM Support Initiative[4]
  • Increased enrollment of ethnic and cultural minority groups[5]
  • Increased online learning and support[6]

 



	
	
	
	
	
	
	
[7] Schoenfeld, A. H. (1992). Learning to think mathematically: Problem solving, metacognition, and sense-making in mathematics. In D. Grouws (Ed.), Handbook for Research on Mathematics Teaching and Learning (pp. 334-370). New York: MacMillan.
[8] Lang, James M. “Do Your Job Better: Metacognition and Student Learning.” The Chronicle of Higher Education. January 17, 2012
[9] Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, R. T.; & Smith, K., (2007) “The State of Cooperative Learning in Postsecondary and Professional Settings,” Educ. Psychol. Rev., 19, 15-29.
[10] Journal of Chemical Education. Vol 77. No. 1.  January 2000.  JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu
[11] Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, R. T.; & Smith, K., (2007) “The State of Cooperative Learning in Postsecondary and Professional Settings,” Educ. Psychol. Rev., 19, 15-29.
[12]  Alvermann, Donna E, Victoria R. Gillis, and Stephen F. Phelps. Content Area Reading and Literacy: Succeeding in Today's Diverse Classrooms. Boston: Pearson, 2013. Print